December 17:Prince of Peace, The Christ of Christmas

Read John 14:1-30

“And He will be called . . . Prince of Peace” (Isaiah 9:6).

“Prince of Peace.” Now that is the name of a person I need to get to know because I can be the “wart of worry.” Let’s face it: the circumstances of life attempt to rob us of peace. You have experienced enough of life to confirm that statement. But while we find ourselves agreeing, let’s not overlook that all-important, operative word “attempt.” It is not a given that external turmoil will successfully steal our internal tranquility. While circumstances attempt to rob us of peace, Christ offers an endless supply of it . . . even in the face of adversity.

Perhaps you are like me . . . and the disciples. Maybe you need to learn that lesson again.  In the Upper Room, the night before the crucifixion, disciples’ world seemed to be crashing in around them. In the context of a meal, their Master seemed to be saying and doing some odd things. He spoke of bread and wine that symbolized His body and blood.  He paused to wash their feet. He talked about dying, leaving, and returning. It was all confusing and unsettling. And, truth be told, the confusion troubled their hearts . . . collecting as fear and anxiety in the deepest recesses of who they were and what they thought.

Meanwhile, Jesus pointed out that this anxious distress only happened because they allowed it to. Twice in this chapter, He challenged them . . . and me (and you, too?) . . . with the words, Do not let your hearts be troubled…” (vv. 1, 27 emphasis mine). Worried? Stop allowing that to happen! Although that may sound easier said than done, the first part of verse 27 makes it clear that He offers something in the place of anxiety . . . peace. “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives.”

We have the power to decide. Will I allow circumstances to create worry? Or will I accept the peace that Christ, the Prince of Peace, has left behind and still gives in bounteous supplies? Isaiah expresses it this way, “You will keep in perfect peace him whose mind is steadfast, because he trusts in you” (Is. 26:3).

Perhaps this Rich Mullins song will remind you of these truths as it does me.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IS2kG3ks9_g&feature=related

sbk

 

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