March 12: The Praise-worthy King

Read Matthew 21:1-11

He rode this part of His journey on a the back of a donkey. He rode right into Jerusalem, where the people would hail Him king. Just five days later, the very people who yelled “Hosanna!” and called Him king would and yell “Crucify Him” as He traveled that journey first to the cross and then to the empty tomb.

We call it Palm Sunday because of the palm branches those people waved as they hailed Him their king. They spread their cloaks on the road in homage to His royalty and yelled “Hosanna!” which means “Save us now!” They saw Him as the victorious king that He would soon prove Himself to be when He walked out of that grave and left death empty-handed.

Jesus the Christ was king as He rode that donkey into Jerusalem and king as He carried that cross up that hill. He was king when they yelled “Hosanna!” and king when they cried out “Crucify!” From deep inside prison walls, Theodulf of Orleans wrote this hymn of praise which can still be heard today in churches all over the world, often on Palm Sunday.

As you read through it, and maybe listen in with the video at the end, sing along in your heart. Tell the King who you believe Him to be. Praise Him, the King forever, with all glory, laud and honor.

All Glory, Laud and Honor, a hymn by Theodulf of Orleans

All glory, laud, and honor
to you, Redeemer, King,
to whom the lips of children
made sweet hosannas ring.
You are the King of Israel
and David’s royal Son,
now in the Lord’s name coming,
the King and Blessed One.

The company of angels
is praising you on high;
and we with all creation
in chorus make reply.
The people of the Hebrews
with palms before you went;
our praise and prayer and anthems
before you we present.

To you before your passion
they sang their hymns of praise;
to you, now high exalted,
our melody we raise.
As you received their praises,
accept the prayers we bring,
for you delight in goodness,
O good and gracious King!

 

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